Publicado: Vie, Agosto 03, 2018
Ciencia | Por Aurelio Ontiveros

United Utilities calls off hosepipe ban

United Utilities calls off hosepipe ban

The first hosepipe ban of the summer that would have affected seven million people in England has been called off.

It last imposed a ban in 2010 and the called off ban would have been the third in the company's 23-year history.

United Utilities had said on Tuesday that there would be no U-turn on the decision to start the ban on Sunday, but it has now announced that the demand for water has eased.

Dr Martin Padley, Water Services Director, said: "We would like to thank all of our customers who have helped in recent weeks by conserving water wherever they can around the home and in the garden".

'Our leakage teams are working 24 hours a day to find and fix as many leaks as possible and we have been moving water around our network. The company was also making changes to operations including installing new pumping stations, pumping between reservoirs and bringing groundwater sources into use, he said.

Recent rainfall and a reduction in customers' water usage, combined with the measures being taken by United Utilities to maximise water available in its network for supply, has led to the lifting of the hosepipe ban planned for this weekend across the North West of England.

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"The long range forecast from the Met Office is one of relatively dry weather into the autumn, so future restrictions are still a possibility if more rain doesn't arrive".

'In the meantime, we are continuing to step up our own response and over the coming weeks you will see our teams out and about, bringing additional water supplies on line and fixing even more leaks.

The weather is predicted to remain hot well into August, which whilst a treat for the United Kingdom, can have a detrimental impact on reservoir levels.

As the weather hots up and less rain falls to replenish reservoirs, the demand for water increases.

The hot, dry summer has been blamed by the industry for causing the ground to dry out and also weakening joints and cracking pipes.

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