Publicado: Vie, Abril 13, 2018
Ciencia | Por Aurelio Ontiveros

God of War's Director Explains Why Combat Has Changed So Much

God of War's Director Explains Why Combat Has Changed So Much

God of War is exclusive to PS4 and will be released on April 20.

This week, Dave Tach joins Charlie Hall for a spoiler-free discussion of God of War.

As relayed by Polygon in their analysis, God of War on the PS4 Pro has a Performance Mode and a Resolution Mode. There is something very traditional in its design, nearly creaking in its combination of RPG looting and Metroidvania puzzle solving, but this is a game with such grand vistas; such gorgeous production values; such enjoyable setpieces that all its parts come together wonderfully.

While the the game isn't a total reset, God of War is going to be a very different experience from past games. Some are hailing it as the greatest game of all time, while others are saying that it is Sony's answer to Nintendo's Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wilds. In a lot of ways young Atreus is the audience's perspective.

Numerous reviewers say that this is a great game in all aspects, but some in particular bring up Kratos' transformation as a character. Tragedy, regret, and wistfulness pervade God of War's storytelling as Kratos and Atreus make their way to the top of a mountain to bid farewell to a loved one.

The new game takes Kratos out of his familiar Greek pantheon stomping ground and places him in unfamiliar mythological territory: as a sojourner walking among Nordic legends. Also: Did they play it wrong?

The game offers three difficulty levels that range from an easy mode for players who "want a story" to an extreme difficulty for those looking for a challenge fit for a true god of war. "God of War is a reflection of what we play".

"Tenemos que pensar en pasar de grupo" — Carlos Tévez
Si Boca tuvo un desgaste que sintió la semana pasada, el trajín de Palmeiras no es menos importante. Hubo 2 triunfos para Palmeiras , 1 para Boca y 5 empates.

The new storyline also pleased critics, as the introduction of Atreus adds another dimension to the already conflicted character of Kratos. I'm certainly not the best player in the world, but I know what I'm doing. It appears that Sony Santa Monica really pulled out all of the stops for this one, as it's been receiving some rave reviews. That's not because God of War hinges its whole structure on a twist, or a gameplay trick you'll never see coming-it doesn't.

Longstanding protagonist Kratos is older, fully bearded and living in the woods with his son, all his youthful rage given way to gruff stoicism. All of Kratos' attacks and abilities can be unlocked using experience points (they act as a sort of currency), but gear requires loot that you'll find strewn around the world, often off the beaten path and hiding in the peculiar crevices in your peripheral.

The combat is not as comically overblown as it once was, but this is still a very violent game, with deliberate, intense fights against creatures ranging from the frozen undead to building-sized monsters. They each have something to learn from each other. Mastering movement, blocking, ranged combat, and combinations will become essential to complete the game. There are no load times in God of War. And it all runs silky smooth with that Sony Santa Monica polish even on the base PlayStation 4.

And just like Kratos and Atreus are two opposites working together, that dynamic can be used to describe the overall game design as well.

God of War is much more deliberate than its predecessors (though often just as chaotic). Or, if you're playing the game on a 1080p screen, the Pro's supersampling will enhance the details. This is such an impressive achievement.

What God of War exemplifies is a series that is not afraid to stray from its established roots.

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